Shark Fishing FAQs

Is catching sharks dangerous?

It can be for someone who doesn’t know how to handle them. But Captain Sean is an experienced shark fisherman and shark handler and keeps it safe for anglers of all ages.

Can children and beginners go on a Daytona Beach shark fishing trip?

Most certainly! Shark fishing in Daytona Beach is a crowd pleaser for all ages with all different types and sizes of sharks.

What kind of sharks can you catch in Daytona Beach?

• Sharp Nose Sharks
• Black Nose Sharks
• Black Tip Sharks
• Spinner Sharks
• Bonnethead Sharks
• Fine Tooth Sharks
• Bull Sharks
• Hammerhead Sharks
• Thresher Sharks
• Tiger Sharks
• Nurse Sharks

What size sharks can you catch in Daytona Beach?

You can encounter sharks of all sizes on a Daytona Beach shark fishing trip from 10 inches to 10+ feet!

What types of sharks are most plentiful in Daytona Beach?

• Black Nose Sharks
• Sharp Nose Sharks
• Black Tip Sharks
• Spinner Sharks
• Hammerhead Sharks
• Bonnethead Sharks

Can we keep the sharks we catch in Daytona Beach?

Yes, as long as they don’t fall under state and federally protected or prohibited species.

What shark species can we catch and keep in Daytona Beach?

These shark species can be kept with no minimum size limit when caught in Daytona Beach.

• Sharp Nose Sharks
• Black Nose Sharks
• Black Tip Sharks
• Bonnethead Sharks
• Fine Tooth Sharks

The following sharks can be kept as long as they have a minimum “fork” length of 54 inches (length from the tip of the nose to the fork of the tail)

• Bull Sharks
• Nurse Sharks
• Spinner Sharks
• Oceanic White Tip Sharks
• Porbeagle Sharks
• Thresher Sharks (Common)

Captain Sean strictly following all state and federal shark fishing regulations.

Source: FWC Recreational Shark Fishing Regulations

What sharks are protected and cannot be kept on a Daytona Beach shark fishing trip?

• White Sharks
• Hammerhead Sharks
• Tiger Sharks
• Sixgill Sharks
• Big Eyed Thresher Sharks
• Caribbean Reef Sharks
• Dusky Sharks
• Sandbar Sharks

Although these shark species cannot be kept, you may still find one on your line.  In that case they have to be returned to the water but are still a lot of fun to catch and photograph!

Captain Sean strictly following all state and federal shark fishing regulations.

Source: FWC Recreational Shark Fishing Regulations

Are sharks good to eat?

They sure are! Black Tip Sharks, Spinner Sharks, Sharp Nose Sharks and Black Nose Sharks are all good eating and prevalent in Daytona Beach. Captain Sean will clean and filet your shark catch for you. Ask Captain Sean which local seafood restaurants will cook your shark catch fresh for you.

What is the best time of year to catch sharks in Daytona Beach?

Typically, from May through September is the best time to fish for sharks in Daytona Beach although some sharks like black tips and others can be caught year round.

The warmer waters of May through September bring more and bigger sharks as well as a larger variety of sharks closer to shore. Plus sharks are more active and hungrier in the warmer months.

How far out do we have to go to catch sharks in Daytona Beach?

Not far! You can catch sharks from the beach on out to 30+ miles from shore.

Are sharks near the beach in Daytona Beach?

They sure are! At night they typically come in closer to the beach to hunt for bait fish. Black nose sharks and black tip sharks and even hammerheads can come right into shallow water to hunt for prey during the day time and night depending on the condition of the ocean.

Can you catch sharks from shore in Daytona Beach?

Yes, you can catch sharks from the shore in Daytona Beach but you will need to take and pass an online educational course on the web at myfwc.com/SharkCourse.  Then you will need to go to the FWC (Florida Fish and Wildlife Conversation Commission) online licensing system to get a Shore Based Shark Fishing permit that must be renewed annually.  You will need this permit even if you are not planning on keeping a shark.

Why is Daytona Beach considered the “Shark Bite Capital of the World” ?

The strong tidal flow through the Ponce de Leon Inlet near Daytona Beach brings organic nutrients from the local rivers and estuaries into the nearby ocean waters. These nutrients are food for small organisms that are in turn food for countless numbers of bait fish such as menhaden, sardines and finger mullet. The increased bait fish populations are abundant food for sharks and the fish they prey on. Plenty of available food means plenty of sharks!

Data from the Florida Museum’s International Shark Attack File, the world’s only scientifically documented database of all recorded shark attacks worldwide, shows Florida is the global leader in shark attacks with 259 from 2012 to 2021. That’s well ahead of second place Austrailia with Hawaii in third place and South Africa in fourth.

But it is Volusia County, home to Daytona Beach and New Smyrna Beach, that has been proclaimed the “Shark Bite Capital of the World” with more reported shark attacks than any other county in Florida and any other locality worldwide.

A guest brings a shark on board
Captain Sean holds a shark for a young angler